I'm 23 living in Massachusetts I've had two brain aneurysms and as a result my short term memory is about 10 mins. i suffer from social phobia/anxiety and try my best to get over it but i'm not making much progress. i come here to attempt to socialize in some form but i usually just get scared and never talk.

23rd April 2014

Photoset reblogged from twitch. with 196,681 notes

thatinfamousbitch:

premiium:

critink:

force-recon:

*Unemployed^

Let’s go through the list, shall we?

  • Stalking Cat was a computer programmer before he passed away earlier this year. He was Native American and trying to become closer to his totem animal. Through this, he helped pioneer all types of body modification and holds several Guinness Book Records.
  • Erik Sprague, aka Lizard Man, was a former PhD candidate. He has a bachelor’s in philosophy and is a performance artist: both through international side shows and as a music festival host.
  • Maria Jose Cristerna aka “La Mujer Vampiro”  (Vampire Woman) is the mother of four children and a fuckin’ lawyer. She started her transformation after getting out of an abusive marriage, and has talked out against domestic violence.
  • Rick Genest aka Rico The Zombie is a fucking international model, has more sponsorships than any of us could ever hope, and was featured in Lady Gaga’s Born This Way video. Not bad for a 27-year old former homeless punk, I’d say.

reblogging for the well researched and accurate shut down, good work mate

Forever reblog

Source: gif-express

21st April 2014

Photoset reblogged from NyliramRae with 31,599 notes

recoveringfrommyconvictions:

thewriterhimself:

rupeerose:

teafortrouble:

megg33k:

I need feminism because most men’s restrooms still aren’t equipped with baby changing stations. As someone who was married to a man who had sole custody of his young son, I’m hyperaware that feminism means EQUALITY, not female superiority. Feminism should and does support a man’s right to be as much of a parent to his child(ren) as any mother is allowed/expected to be.

This is a constant problem for Mr. Tea and myself. We’ve got twins, so even though I can change one kid on the change table in the ladies’ room, he’s left standing sort of awkwardly in the lobby with a messy child while I change one, come back, and get the other.

Nobody’s suggesting that men aren’t parents, so the lack of change tables goes well beyond ‘gender role reinforcing’ and straight into ‘ridiculous’.

My dad actually almost got kicked out of a mall once for changing my brother in the womens room of a mall. The only reason they didn’t call the cops on him was because the ladies in the room supported him.

This must be an old fucking post because public restrooms I see have these in the men’s room.

Here in Colorado (or maybe just my area of CO), most men’s rooms do not have this. I have a male friend who takes care of his daughter on a regular basis and there have been regular instances that when we’re in public, I’ve taken responsibility for changing her because there aren’t changing tables in the male restrooms. 

Source: megg33k

21st April 2014

Photo reblogged from with 321 notes

Source: absintheandroses

21st April 2014

Photo reblogged from Keep Calm and Vape On with 32 notes

Source: vapehead71

21st April 2014

Post reblogged from welcome to my thoughts with 103,366 notes

nerdinessinabluebox:

thorthousand1:

Just called an anorexia help line and the girl answered and immediately hearing I was male said “you’re real funny douche” and hung up. If you dot think that’s messed up, u messed up.

ARE YOU FREAKING KIDDING ME

Source: thorthousand1

19th April 2014

Photo reblogged from Alex Vliet with 215 notes

bananacookiexx:

♥너의 세상으로♥ na We Heart It.

bananacookiexx:

♥너의 세상으로♥ na We Heart It.

Source: weheartit.com

19th April 2014

Question reblogged from with 80 notes

Anonymous asked: Jesus offers salvation, why would you choose not to be saved?

moonflowerchilde:

Saved from what? I am not damned, I do not believe in sin, I do not believe in hell and I do not believe in heaven. So if I believe in none, what do I have to be saved from?

Source: moonflowerchilde

19th April 2014

Photo reblogged from Tourette Syndrme with 7 notes

aterflamma:

Teenagers diagnosed with Tourette Syndrome (TS) were slower than their typically developing peers when asked to perform a task that involved them simply moving their eyes to look at targets. However, they significantly outperformed their peers when the task was more demanding and required them to choose between looking at or away from targets. In this task they were as fast as their peers but made fewer eye movements in the wrong direction.
The study, undertaken by researchers at The University of Nottingham and published in the British Journal of Neuropsychology, showed that the children with TS who performed the best on the most demanding task were also those who had fewer tics.
Professor Georgina Jackson, in the Institute of Mental Health, said: “A healthy child is not continuously worrying about unpredictably doing something embarrassing but a child with TS is often anxious that the unintentional movements or noises they make will draw attention to themselves.’
“They can devote considerable time and effort every day trying to delay or conceal these movements in class, and it can be exhausting. Yet, when we ask them to complete a difficult control task like ours which requires them to be really careful if they are not to make mistakes we find that they are very good.”
Professor Jackson added: “When presented with a stimulus which we find interesting, it is a natural human response to want to look at it. Often when asked to purposefully not look our eyes will momentarily glance towards it for a fraction of a second before our brain corrects the behaviour.”
Tourette syndrome is a neurodevelopmental disorder that causes involuntary noises and movements called tics. These can range from eye blinking, mouth opening and throat clearing, to more complex sequences of movements such as head-shaking, scratching and gestures and repeated phrases.
Tics start in early childhood — typically between five and seven years of age — and peak between the ages of eight and twelve years old before becoming less frequent and severe for many sufferers.
TS can often also be associated with other conditions such as obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD) or attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). The children in the current study did not have a diagnosis of ADHD. ADHD is associated with impairments on demanding control tasks such as the one used in this study.
Experts still don’t know exactly what causes the disorder, but it is thought to be linked to abnormalities with some parts of the brain, including the basal ganglia, which helps regulate the body’s movements including eye movements.
It has been suggested that since TS results in tics there should also be a general impairment in controlling voluntary movements. This is not what this study finds. Although reflexive eye movements are slower, controlled movements are improved and this improvement is related to less severe tics. Previous studies by our group have suggested that this improvement in controlled movements is related to changes in the motor control regions of the brain.
“Our tasks tested which group of participants experienced the most number of these tiny errors and we found that the children with TS performed particularly well in this respect,” added Professor Jackson.
Participants in the study performed two tasks: one required them to repeatedly look at a target (known as pro-saccade) while the other involved shifting unpredictably between looking at an object and looking away (anti-saccade).
The study found that the TS group were around 20 milliseconds slower to initiate and complete the task when they were asked to repeatedly look at a target, compared to the control group.
However, when presented with the more complex task of switching between looking at a target and looking away from a target the study found that the children with TS made significantly less — 20% less — than the control group.
There was also a strong positive correlation between the performance of these TS children and their score on the Tale Global Tic Severity Scale. The data suggests that those who showed the greatest cognitive control also exhibit lower levels of tics.
The researchers add that further studies over the longer term are needed to find out whether cognitive control measures like those used in this research could be used to predict the likely remission of tics during adolescence.

aterflamma:

Teenagers diagnosed with Tourette Syndrome (TS) were slower than their typically developing peers when asked to perform a task that involved them simply moving their eyes to look at targets. However, they significantly outperformed their peers when the task was more demanding and required them to choose between looking at or away from targets. In this task they were as fast as their peers but made fewer eye movements in the wrong direction. The study, undertaken by researchers at The University of Nottingham and published in the British Journal of Neuropsychology, showed that the children with TS who performed the best on the most demanding task were also those who had fewer tics. Professor Georgina Jackson, in the Institute of Mental Health, said: “A healthy child is not continuously worrying about unpredictably doing something embarrassing but a child with TS is often anxious that the unintentional movements or noises they make will draw attention to themselves.’ “They can devote considerable time and effort every day trying to delay or conceal these movements in class, and it can be exhausting. Yet, when we ask them to complete a difficult control task like ours which requires them to be really careful if they are not to make mistakes we find that they are very good.” Professor Jackson added: “When presented with a stimulus which we find interesting, it is a natural human response to want to look at it. Often when asked to purposefully not look our eyes will momentarily glance towards it for a fraction of a second before our brain corrects the behaviour.” Tourette syndrome is a neurodevelopmental disorder that causes involuntary noises and movements called tics. These can range from eye blinking, mouth opening and throat clearing, to more complex sequences of movements such as head-shaking, scratching and gestures and repeated phrases. Tics start in early childhood — typically between five and seven years of age — and peak between the ages of eight and twelve years old before becoming less frequent and severe for many sufferers. TS can often also be associated with other conditions such as obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD) or attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). The children in the current study did not have a diagnosis of ADHD. ADHD is associated with impairments on demanding control tasks such as the one used in this study. Experts still don’t know exactly what causes the disorder, but it is thought to be linked to abnormalities with some parts of the brain, including the basal ganglia, which helps regulate the body’s movements including eye movements. It has been suggested that since TS results in tics there should also be a general impairment in controlling voluntary movements. This is not what this study finds. Although reflexive eye movements are slower, controlled movements are improved and this improvement is related to less severe tics. Previous studies by our group have suggested that this improvement in controlled movements is related to changes in the motor control regions of the brain. “Our tasks tested which group of participants experienced the most number of these tiny errors and we found that the children with TS performed particularly well in this respect,” added Professor Jackson. Participants in the study performed two tasks: one required them to repeatedly look at a target (known as pro-saccade) while the other involved shifting unpredictably between looking at an object and looking away (anti-saccade). The study found that the TS group were around 20 milliseconds slower to initiate and complete the task when they were asked to repeatedly look at a target, compared to the control group. However, when presented with the more complex task of switching between looking at a target and looking away from a target the study found that the children with TS made significantly less — 20% less — than the control group. There was also a strong positive correlation between the performance of these TS children and their score on the Tale Global Tic Severity Scale. The data suggests that those who showed the greatest cognitive control also exhibit lower levels of tics. The researchers add that further studies over the longer term are needed to find out whether cognitive control measures like those used in this research could be used to predict the likely remission of tics during adolescence.

19th April 2014

Video reblogged from NyliramRae with 51,152 notes

intertnet:

my boyfriend sent me this at 4 in the morning 

Source: intertnet

19th April 2014

Photo with 6 notes

I strongly debated posting this or not but my lovely girlfriend made it hilarious and I had to share.

I strongly debated posting this or not but my lovely girlfriend made it hilarious and I had to share.

Tagged: me

18th April 2014

Photo reblogged from My Kinda Crazy with 525,687 notes

katfuckingkolb:

fatxslut:

Good thing I can experience the lunar eclipse from the comfort of my own bed on the interweb.

Fer real doe

katfuckingkolb:

fatxslut:

Good thing I can experience the lunar eclipse from the comfort of my own bed on the interweb.

Fer real doe

Source: blowsive

18th April 2014

Photo reblogged from breanna. with 210,773 notes


Eclipse lunar 2014

Eclipse lunar 2014

Source: brokendreamsandsadness

18th April 2014

Photo reblogged from with 23,807 notes


Red Moon, Lunar Eclipse on México, April 14th 15th 2014.

Red Moon, Lunar Eclipse on México, April 14th 15th 2014.

Source: bryanchvzz

17th April 2014

Post reblogged from Sweetheart with 221,392 notes

I have stretch marks.

smallerbenz:

Reblog if you do too. Just to prove that it is more normal than what people actually think.

Source: happy-healthy-kitty

17th April 2014

Photo reblogged from with 1,872 notes

uberphones:

The women who lied to put this man in jail messages him “let bygones be bygones” after she finally admits that he did not rape her.This is the second post I’ve done on Brian Banks. Check out the other one here.

uberphones:

The women who lied to put this man in jail messages him “let bygones be bygones” after she finally admits that he did not rape her.

This is the second post I’ve done on Brian Banks. Check out the other one here.

Source: uberphones